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Subject:
From:
Patrick McCarthy <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Charles Dickens Forum <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Thu, 1 Dec 2016 13:58:25 -0800
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Friends of the Dickens Forum,

     Julian Crowe <[log in to unmask]>  adds to the purposes to which 
Dickens puts
wills.  He sees will as both powerful and powerless.                     
      (pjm)
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Yes, wills in Dickens represent the power of the past to bind the present.
> But as with all his most powerful symbols, Dickens, the great opportunist,
> returns again and again to the matter of wills, offering different accounts
> of what they mean.  For instance, there's the fragility of human attempts
> to influence the future that we see in the ease with which a will, a mere
> bit of paper, can be suppressed, like Gilbert Clennam's codicil.  Making a
> will can be a positive thing, part of our responsibility to set our affairs
> in order, which Mr Spenlow so spectacularly fails to do. Dickens is
> fascinated by the power, and powerlessness, of words on paper to control
> our lives, for good or ill.
>
> All the best
>
> Julian Crowe
>
>