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Subject:
From:
Patrick McCarthy <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Charles Dickens Forum <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Mon, 20 Apr 2015 20:07:36 -0700
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Friends of the Dickens Forum,

     First, our thanks to Miriam Margolyes and Christine Maiocco for 
sending URL's for
accessing the illustrations of John Thomas Smith, particularly the ones 
titled
"Remarkable Beggars."  In his post below, Michael John Allen also 
supplies the URL
and, as you see, finds "interesting connections" to Dickens. Thank you 
all.    (pjm)
-----
> Dear Patrick,
>
>   
>
> Many thanks to Grahame Smith for drawing attention to John Thomas Smith.  I
> hadn't come across him before.
>
>   
>
> I found excellent copies of his illustrations of beggars at
> http://spitalfieldslife.com/2015/04/17/john-thomas-smiths-remarkable-beggars
> / .  There are links here to other aspects of his work.
>
>   
>
> I came across two interesting connections to Dickens.  Firstly, Smith
> produced an attractive watercolour of Hungerford Market which I hadn't seen
> before, dated 1830.  It doesn't show the premises of Warren's Blacking but
> it does show the area the 11-years-old Dickens would have walked through
> each day on his way to the warehouse at Hungerford Stairs.  Secondly, at the
> foot of each illustration of beggars shown on the Spitalfields Life website
> above, the address of John Thomas Smith is given as 4 Chandos Street, Covent
> Garden.  By great coincidence Warren's Blacking moved from Hungerford Stairs
> to 3-4 Chandos Streeet, Covent Garden in 1824.  This is where Dickens sat
> doing his work in the front window, watched by passers-by.  It had
> originally been two shops, but was combined into one.  As far as I know
> there is only one illustration of these premises.
>
>   
>
> John Thomas Smith is a name I shall, now, certainly keep by me for
> reference.  Another artist I greatly like for the time is George Scharf.
> Are there others that Dickens-listers would like to draw attention to?
>
>   
>
> Michael Allen.
> <[log in to unmask]>
>    _____
>
>