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Subject:
From:
Patrick McCarthy <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Charles Dickens Forum <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Fri, 4 Feb 2011 18:34:50 -0800
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Friends of the Dickens Forum,

	Philadelphia'`s Herb Moscovitz has had a note from Michael Slater
and passes it on to us:					(pjm)
-----
*Faulks on Fiction. Great British  Characters and the Secret Life of the
Novel*
 	In the Culture section of last Sunday's *Sunday Times* critic and
distinguished literary scholar John Carey reviewed best-selling novelist
Sebastian Faulks's new book *Faulks on Fiction. Great British Characters
and the Secret Life of the Novel* in  which Faulks discusses 28
characters from British fiction (heroes, lovers, snobs  and villains). I
quote from the end of Carey's  review: 'David Copperfield, Pride  and
Prejudice and Sons and Lovers, read in the space of a single spring term
when he [Faulks] was in the fifth form, convinced him that literature was
the  most important thing on earth.  When he came to the bit where David
Copperfield turns to the woman he loves - "O Agnes, O my soul" - he found
he was  making "strange snorting noises", caused by the fact that he was
sobbing but  trying to keep his eyes open so that he could go on reading.
This is not the sort of recommendation literary criticism generally
offers, and Faulks's  relaxed, sharply observed book will no doubt be
sneered at by academics. That is  another reason for reading
it.'