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Subject:
From:
Patrick McCarthy <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
Charles Dickens Forum <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Mon, 12 Mar 2012 19:01:49 -0700
Content-Type:
MULTIPART/MIXED
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Friends of the Dickens forum,

	What one or two of you catches an omission in a
D-L post, and supplies the omission without fuss, well, that
is a joy to delight any editor.  Here Russell Potter
<[log in to unmask]> notes and corects with wit as well.
May we add that Pamela Dalziel notes and corects with equal
grace:

----

Since "Death of Nancy Sikes" has not -- so far as we know --
survived, none of this challenges the newly-found film as the
"earliest surviving" -- of course, when it comes to very early film,
a saying comes to mind that was once popular in the Soviet Union
(where disgraced officials were retroactively airbrushed out of photos):
"You can never predict the past."  The Edison film "Death of Nancy Sikes"
`might always turn up somewhere; Edison's 1910 version of Frankenstein,
which was thought to have been lost for decades, turned up in a lone copy
in the private collection of a film collector in Wisconsin, who didn't
realize what he had until the 1970's and only allowed its DVD release
years after that!

RP

On Mon, Mar 12, 2012 at 2:27 PM, Patrick McCarthy
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
      Friends of the Dickens Forum,

          William Moeck <[log in to unmask]> has kindly
      forwarded
      to us an account of a 1901 movie found in the British
      Film
      Institute, which is claimed to be the "earliest surviving
      film
      featuring a character from the works of Charles Dickens."
      The URL follows.

          However (said slowly), in a long impressive piece
      appearing
      in the *Times Literary Supplement* February 10, 2012,
      entitled
      "Dickens on Screen," Peter Parker writes as follows:
      "The earliest known Dickens adaptation, "Death of Nancy
      Sikes"
      (sic), was an American production of 1897, made a year
      after
      the first public production of "Edison's latest marvel".
      "Charles
      Ross and Mabel Fenton, who are very prominent in
      vaudeville and
      burlesque, in their thrilling sketch taken from Dickens's
      novel
      *Oliver Twist*, contemporary publicity promised."

          All clarifications are welcome.

      The URL: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/mar/09/oldest-charles-dickens-film-disc
      overed/print

PJM, courtesy of William Moeck




--
Russell A. Potter, Ph.D.
Professor of English
Rhode Island College
600 Mt Pleasant Ave
Providence, RI 02908

http://www.ric.edu/faculty/rpotter