Friends of the Dickens Forum,

     Robert Tracy <rtracy@berkeley,edu> likes to put words in context:   
                  (pjm)
>
>
> Dear Colleagues: In context, Eugene describes "our friend" as living on a
> bland invalid diet, until his doctor told him he could eat more interesting
> food. When he did so, a leg of mutton soon finished him off. "Daygo" is, as
> Don Cox points out, the ending of the day, sunset, sundown. Here it seems
> to be "our friend's" death, that "dying of the light" that Dylan Thomas
> urges us to "rage, rage" against.
> Robert Tracy
>
> On Fri, Mar 11, 2016 at 4:09 PM, Patrick McCarthy <[log in to unmask]
>> wrote:
>> 12:38
>> Friends of the Dickens Forum,
>>
>> Here is Don Richard Cox responding to Gail Houston's question about the
>> OMF word "daygo." (pjm)
>>
>>> Fred Levit, in A Dickens Glossary for American Readers, glosses this very
>>> passage, stating that "daygo" is the going of the day---the end of the
>>> day.
>>> I'm not certain that completely clarifies the passage for me, however.
>>>
>>>
>>> drc
>>>
>>>
>>> Don Richard Cox
>>>
>>> _________________________
>>>
>>>    <mailto:[log in to unmask]> [log in to unmask]
>>>
>>>
>>> From: Charles Dickens Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
>>> Behalf Of
>>> Patrick McCarthy
>>> Sent: Friday, March 11, 2016 3:20 PM
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> Subject: Word Meaning in OMF?
>>>
>>>
>>> Friends of the Dickens Forum,
>>>
>>>       Gail Turley Houston has come across a word in OMF which, in our young
>>> street days used to be a racial slur:  (pjm)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Dear Colleagues:  I'm trying to find the meaning of a slang term in
>>> Dickens's OMF:  In chapter two, book 1, Eugene is discussing the gossip re
>>> the dead man and says: "'Except,' Eugene strikes in: so unexpectedly that
>>> the mature young lady, who has forgotten all about him, with a start takes
>>> the epaulette out of his way: 'except our friend who long lived on
>>> rice-pudding and isinglass, till at length to his something or other, his
>>> physician said something else, and a leg of mutton somehow ended in
>>> daygo.'"
>>>      Does anyone know what "daygo" means?  I couldn't find it in the
>>> Victorian
>>> slang dictionary. Thanks!  gail
>>>      Gail Turley Houston
>>>    Recipient, Governor's Award for
>>>    Outstanding New Mexico Women, 2011
>>>    Professor, Associate Chair Graduate Studies, English
>>>    Department of English
>>>    University of New Mexico
>>>    Humanities Bldg 227
>>>    MSC03 2170
>>>    Albuquerque, NM 87131
>>>    [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>>      ________________________________
>>>
>>>
>>>